2016 Conversations on Privacy

WEDNESDAYS @ 6:30PM 
OCT 19 – NOV 16
FOX TUCSON THEATRE

With every click and swipe, we can access unimaginable amounts of information online. We also leave a trail of personal data, revealing secrets about our health, habits, beliefs, and plans. This fall, join the UA College of Social & Behavioral Sciences for a series of discussions with national experts who will explore the benefits and dangers of the digital age.

 

 

Conversations

Wednesday, October 19
KIDS ONLINE
Relationships and Privacy in a World of Tinder and Twitter

From baby photos posted on grandma’s Facebook page to Snapchat selfies, today’s children and teens are growing up publicly online. The unprecedented rise of virtual interactions and access to digital information raises concerns about how new technology is influencing young people and their relationships with peers, loved ones, and the world at large.  How is the first digital generation managing their online identity and interactions and how will they redefine “privacy"? How is the digital divide influencing the way kids and parents communicate? What can families, schools, communities, and kids do to ensure safe and fulfilling interactions in an online world?

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
KIDS ONLINE
Relationships and Privacy in a World of Tinder and Twitter
Wednesday, Oct 19 | 6:30 pm | Fox Tucson Theatre

Chis Segrin

Chris Segrin is chair of the UA Department of Communication and a behavioral scientist who studies interpersonal relationships and mental health. His research focuses on social skills, and such problems as depression, anxiety, and loneliness, in addition to communication in marriage and families.

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Wednesday, October 26
MEDIA EXPOSÉ
Fame and Shame in the Digital Age

In the digital world, we leave a trail of photos, videos, conversations, and other information that can be easily obtained and posted online for everyone to see forever. For journalists trying to hold governments and corporations accountable, this information can be helpful in exposing wrongdoing. For private citizens and celebrities, however, the online publication of personal information can be devastating. In the complicated information age, how do we balance the public’s right to know with the individual’s right to privacy?

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
MEDIA EXPOSÉ
Fame and Shame in the Digital Age
Wednesday, Oct 26 | 6:30 pm | Fox Tucson Theatre

David Cuillier

David Cuillier is director of the UA School of Journalism, where he teaches and researches media law, access to government records, data analysis, and public affairs reporting. He is former president of the Society of Professional Journalists and co-author of “Transparency 2.0: Digital Data and Privacy in a Wired World.”

Emma Llansó

Emma Llansó is director of the Free Expression Project with the Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT), which works to promote law and policy that support users’ free expression rights in the United States and around the world. She leads CDT’s work in advancing speech-protective policies aimed at ensuring that online expression receives the highest level of protection under the First Amendment.

Jack Gillum

Jack Gillum is an Associated Press reporter for the Washington, D.C. investigations desk covering privacy, technology, and surveillance.  He relies on databases and programming to sift through the massive world of information.  He broke the story that Hillary Clinton used a private email server at her home and he mined information on Instagram to track Illinois Rep. Aaron Schock's spending.  While at USA Today, he pursued data-driven investigations into standardized test cheating.  He has also reported for the Arizona Daily Star in Tucson, his hometown.

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Wednesday, November 02
CORPORATE DATA COLLECTION
What Are We Willing To Give?

Companies collect information from customers to provide customized services and stay competitive. Customers too can find high value in exchanging their information for personalized services. But is the data market always a win-win situation? What are the trade-offs you make when you pay for services with personal information? In this conversation, we will shed light on the hidden privacy challenges that new technology-based services bring about. We will also delve into the future of corporate data collection and digital advertising, including facial recognition technology, mobile location analysis, and the “internet of things.” 

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
CORPORATE DATA COLLECTION
What Are We Willing To Give?
Wednesday, Nov 02 | 6:30 pm | Fox Tucson Theatre

Laura Brandimarte

Laura Brandimarte is an assistant professor in the Management Information Systems Department at the UA Eller College of Management.  Her research focuses on the behavioral aspects of privacy and the consequences of disclosing personal information, especially on social media. 

Richard Kosinski

Richard Kosinski is an expert in digital media, having held a variety of senior leadership roles in sales, marketing, and product development for notable media brands including: The Wall Street Journal, Yahoo!, CNET, and Quantcast.  Currently he is President & Global Chief Revenue Officer of MediaBrix, the global leader in delivering mobile ad campaigns that create emotional connections between bands and humans. Richard is based in New York. 

Ashkan Soltani

Ashkan Soltani is an independent researcher and technologist specializing on issues relating to privacy, security, and behavioral economics. Formerly the chief technologist for the Federal Trade Commission, he advised the commission on its technology-related policy and helped to create its new Office of Technology Research and Investigation.

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Wednesday, November 09
BODIES & HEALTH
Wearing Your Doctor on Your Wrist

Your medical tests, mobile health apps, and wearable devices (like fitbits) produce data that reveal insights into your health and behavior. What happens to that data? This conversation will reveal how new and emerging technologies, such as personal wearable devices that can collect and transfer information on your wellbeing, are changing public health, the practice of medicine, and employment and insurance – now and in the future. We will highlight the biggest risks to your privacy and meaningful ways to maintain control over your personal information without losing the health benefits of the digital revolution. 

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
BODIES & HEALTH
Wearing Your Doctor on Your Wrist
Wednesday, Nov 09 | 6:30 pm | Fox Tucson Theatre

Jane Bambauer

Jane Bambauer is an associate professor in the UA James E. Rogers College of Law. Her research assesses the social costs and benefits of data, and shows how many popular privacy laws can inhibit socially beneficial research and innovation in health, education, and law enforcement. 

Michelle De Mooy

Michelle De Mooy is acting director for the Privacy and Data Project at the Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT). She leads CDT’s health privacy work on ethical and privacy-aware internal research and development in wearables; the application of data analytics to health information found on non-traditional platforms, like social media; and the growing market for genetic data. 

Shelten Yuen

Shelten Yuen is the vice president of research at Fitbit Inc., where he oversees development in new hardware, sensors, and algorithms in wearable computing. As a founding engineer of Fitbit Inc., Shelten developed the core algorithms in the fitbit trackers. Before that, Shelten was at MIT Lincoln Laboratory and Agilent Technologies. 

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Wednesday, November 16
GOVERNMENT SURVEILLANCE
Finding the Right Balance for Democracy

Through our phones and other personal devices, governments have an unprecedented ability to collect data on our whereabouts, conversations, habits, purchases, and connections. Many are concerned that this new level of surveillance will impede free speech and the ability of social movements to organize. At the same time, however, illegal groups and networks use these same devices to organize, recruit, and do harm. Surveillance of these “dark networks” can do much to protect society at large. This conversation grapples with how a democratic society strives to achieve an acceptable tradeoff between individual privacy rights, the rights of free speech, and national security.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
GOVERNMENT SURVEILLANCE
Finding the Right Balance for Democracy
Wednesday, Nov 16 | 6:30 pm | Fox Tucson Theatre

Brint Milward

Brint Milward is director of the UA School of Government and Public Policy and was the first director of the National Institute for Civil Discourse.  Since 9/11 he has studied illegal and covert networks. His articles on "dark networks," have been widely cited for their application to terrorist networks, human trafficking, drug smuggling, and other illegal activities.

Aaron Brantly

Aaron Brantly is assistant professor in the Department of Social Sciences and Combating Terrorism Center at West Point. He has ten years of experience working in international development with a focus on communication technologies. His research focuses on national security policy issues in cyberspace including big data, terrorism, intelligence, decision-making, and human rights.

Jennifer Earl

Jennifer Earl, a professor of sociology at the UA, researches the Internet and social movements, social movement repression, and legal change. She is the recipient of a National Science Foundation award for research on Web activism and receives funding to research social movement organizations.

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LOCATION

The Fox Tucson Theatre is located at 17 W. Congress Street at the northwest corner of Congress St. and Stone Ave. in downtown Tucson. Parking downtown is easy! On-street parking downtown is free after 5:00pm, plus there are plenty of parking garages nearby. Please see the map and information below. Or consider taking the Sun Link Street Car, which runs through downtown Tucson from the UA Medical Campus to the Mercado San Agustin.  

 


1. La Placita Parking Garage (two blocks south of The Fox Theater)